DGCA to Start Checking Airplanes on Night Stops

The focus will be on aircraft that have been in service for a long time and have accumulated a large number of flying hours to ensure that their structural integrity is not jeopardised.

Highlights

  • DGCA plans to perform a thorough examination of commercial aeroplanes in the country.
  • The investigation began with an examination of SpiceJet's entire fleet, which included nearly half of the airline's 70+ planes.
  • The DGCA intends to conduct additional inspections of ageing planes and airlines with poor financial standing.

Web Stories

DGCA to
The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA), India's aviation authority, plans to perform a thorough examination of commercial aeroplanes in the country. The focus will be on aircraft that have been in service for a long time and have accumulated a large number of flying hours to ensure that their structural integrity is not jeopardised.

In India, a sequence of incidents in the previous few weeks have focused attention on the structural fitness of commercial aeroplanes. The DGCA has been exceptionally busy recently, dealing with one incident after another, leading it to conduct rigorous inspections of older aircraft.

The investigation began with an examination of SpiceJet's entire fleet, which included nearly half of the airline's 70+ planes. They're identifying problems and figuring out how to solve them. It should be emphasised that these inspections are in addition to the usual maintenance checks that these planes undergo.

To safeguard the safety of flight operations, the DGCA has made it clear to SpiceJet that they will need to loosen their purse strings and spend more on cabin care.

The DGCA intends to conduct additional inspections of ageing planes and airlines with poor financial standing. Even before the pandemic, most Indian airlines did not have a strong financial position, and COVID-19 put a stop to any potential progress.

The Indian aviation authority wants to make sure that a shortage of funds does not lead to a lack of attention to aircraft maintenance. It recognises that aircraft may need to be grounded for repairs and maintenance, which could cause flight delays or cancellations. However, it wants to put safety first before routine operations.

Datchanapriya is a journalism and mass communication student from Chennai. Has always been passionate about writing and connecting with people.

Recent Comments

  • No Most discussed posts - 1 week ago....!

Tech News

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments